Volume 6, Issue 1, June 2020, Page: 12-19
Task of Local Anaesthesia in Major Maxillofacial Surgical Operations (A 36 Case Series Operated in Al-Salam Teaching Hospital)
Rawaa Younus Al-Rawee, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Al-Salam Teaching Hospital, Ministry of Health, Mosul, Iraq
Amar Yaseen Al-Anee, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Al-Kadhimiya Teaching Hospital, Ministry of Health, Baghdad, Iraq
Saud Salim Saeed, Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, Al-Salam Teaching Hospital, Ministry of Health, Mosul, Iraq
Bashar Abdul-Ghani Tawfeeq, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Al-Salam Teaching Hospital, Ministry of Health, Mosul, Iraq
Received: Mar. 11, 2020;       Accepted: Apr. 1, 2020;       Published: Apr. 23, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijcoms.20200601.13      View  310      Downloads  65
Abstract
Oral and maxillofacial surgery is that specialty of dentistry including the diagnosis as well as surgical and adjunctive treatment of diseases, injuries, and defects, including both the functional and esthetic aspects of hard and soft tissues of oral and maxillofacial region. Local anesthesia (LA) also has role in maxillofacial surgeries, some oral and maxillofacial surgical procedures can, however, be performed, with or without conscious sedation depending on the extent of the lesion and the ease of surgical access. We aim in this article to high lighting role of local anesthesia for surgical management of major maxillofacial operations already planned to be operated under general anaesthesia. Sample presentation of major maxillofacial cases that can be underwent under local anesthesia also patients evaluation regarding pain and wound healing. Case series of 36 patients (5-78) years old, from (2004-2013) attained Maxillofacial department at Al-Salam (Mosul) and Al-Kadhimiya (Baghdad) Teaching Hospital. All patients underwent major surgeries under local anesthesia (5-7 cartridges). Patients evaluated regarding pain, wound healing and recovery period. Five patients had moderate intraoperative pain that forced us to increase the dose of local anesthesia, minimal blood ooze one hour postoperatively; healing process was uncomplicated. In accordance to time need for each surgery half of cases need no more than 30 minutes to complete the surgery. More than half of patients (27.77% -33.33%) recommend 4-5 cartridge of local anesthesia uses to complete the surgeries. Oral and Maxillofacial operations which can be managed under local anesthesia are practicable and were tolerated and accepted by the adult patients. Local anesthesia can be used to facilitate safer and more efficient procedures especially in medically compromised patients. Local anesthesia surgeries alleviate risk factors and laryngeal discomfort associated with surgeries under general anesthesia, no starvation and minimal hospital stay.
Keywords
Major Maxillofacial Surgeries, Local Anesthesia, General Anesthesia
To cite this article
Rawaa Younus Al-Rawee, Amar Yaseen Al-Anee, Saud Salim Saeed, Bashar Abdul-Ghani Tawfeeq, Task of Local Anaesthesia in Major Maxillofacial Surgical Operations (A 36 Case Series Operated in Al-Salam Teaching Hospital), International Journal of Clinical Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Vol. 6, No. 1, 2020, pp. 12-19. doi: 10.11648/j.ijcoms.20200601.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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